France: Articles on French Wine & Wine Regions

2015 Château Thivin Côte de Brouilly Cuvée Godefroy, Beaujolais - Wine Review

Grade: 
A
Score: 
93

A bit lighter in style (truer?) than most of the other 2015 Beaujolais I tasted.  To me, that was a good thing.  Purple/ruby in color.  The nose is very tight at first but then opens

2015 Georges Dubœuf Morgon Côte du Py Domaine de Javerniere

Grade: 
A-
Score: 
92

Inky purple in color.  Opaque.  The nose has sandalwood, black raspberries and dark cherries.  Deep and complex on the palate.  Black cherries with some dark chocolate notes.&nb

2015 Daniel Bouland Morgon Schiste

Grade: 
A-
Score: 
91

Purple/Ruby in color.  The nose has dark cherries and a nice earthiness to it.  Just a hint of funk.  On the palate, this has sweet black cherry fruit.  Seems packed quite tight

2015 Georges Dubœuf Morgon Jean-Ernest Descombes, France, Beaujolais - Wine Review

Grade: 
A
Score: 
93

Purple and opaque in color.  The nose has black cherries, and black olives with some black raspberries.  Again, it reminds me of the northern Rhone (not a bad thing).  Very smooth.&n

2015 Coudert Fleurie Clos de la Roilette Cuvée Tardive, Beaujolais - Wine Review

Grade: 
A-
Score: 
91

Purple/ruby in color.  Bright.  The nose takes a moment then shows black cherries, some candied qualities.  Someone said butterscotch, and that is close.  With more air, black c

2012 Patrick Piuze Chablis Premier Cru Les Forêts

Grade: 
A-
Score: 
90

Gold in color.  A bit deeper, probably saw some new oak.  The nose is dusty with some lemon and spice.  On the palate, this is a very rich wine.  Very good, if to me, un-Chablis

2009 Domaine du Vissoux / Pierre-Marie Chermette Moulin-à-Vent Les Trois Roches

Grade: 
A-
Score: 
92

Showing just a bit of age at this point, but still has some development left.  Ruby/purple in color.  The nose is initially tight but opens with some celery and sandalwood.  With air

Top 75 French Wines to Try Before You Quit Drinking (a non-dump bucket list if you will!)

If you are a wine lover, wine connoisseur, wine aficionado or even if you just like to have a couple of glasses on a Friday night, it soon becomes obvious that there are some wines that are held in a higher esteem in the wine world.  Sometimes, it is because these wines are very rare.  Other times, it’s because the wine has a place in history.   Sometimes it’s because the wine is just that good.  Here is a list of 75 wines from France that make up that category.  A few caveats.  I have not tried every wine on this list.  Some I have and others I hope to.  Many of these wines are rare and hard to find.  That doesn’t mean they shouldn’t be on the list.  After all, if the opportunity presents itself, go for it. 

Q&A with Allen Meadows of Burghound.com

Allen Meadows, author of Burghound.com, a highly respected and critically acclaimed quarterly publication that reaches subscribers in more than 60 countries and nearly all 50 states. Burghound.com was the first of its kind to offer specialized, exhaustive coverage of a specific wine region and grape, he and pioneered the on-line format. There are reviews of the wines of Burgundy and U.S. Pinot Noir, as well as coverage of Champagne. Subscribers have access to a fully searchable database of nearly 60,000 of Meadows’ tasting notes with recommended drinking windows for present day vintages all the way back to 1845. Meadows spends four months every year in Burgundy and visits more than 300 domaines during that time. He is also the author of “The Pearl of the Côte – The Great Wines of Vosne-Romanée.”

Q&A with Jean-Charles Boisset, of Boisset Family Estates

Founded in 1980, Boisset Family Estates is a family-owned producer and importer of fine wines with its roots in Burgundy, France. Boisset’s collection of more than twenty historical and unique wineries boast leading positions in the world’s pre-eminent terroirs, including Burgundy, Beaujolais, the Rhône Valley, the South of France, Canada, and California’s Russian River Valley and Napa Valley. Jean-Charles Boisset, President of Boisset Family Estates, has implemented sustainable, organic, and biodynamic farming practices at the family’s vineyards, while simultaneously introducing alternative packaging innovations that reduce a wine’s environmental impact and carbon footprint.

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