2017 Or Haganuz Rosé Amuka Naburia, Israel, Galilee, Wine Review

Salmon pink in color.  The nose is very nice with watermelon, slight celery note and with air, a bit or rhubarb.  Not under ripe though.  On the palate, there are some slight cherry notes on the attack.  Watermelon on the mid-palate and finishing with some strawberry notes.  Not a ton of acidity but some.  Works fine with lighter foods but make a great refreshing drink on the patio.  There is some complexity here as well.  This is an equal blend of Cabernet Franc, Merlot, Shiraz and Mourvedre.  It is dry.  Retails for under $20 making this well priced.  Probably should be drunk by 2020.  

2010 Mollydooker Enchanted Path, Australia, McClaren Vale, Wine Review

This is a classic big Australian export wine.  Its a blend of Shiraz and Cabernet and really goes well on a cold winter's day.  Inky purple in color.  The nose has some black cherry cough syrup, black raspberries and black pepper.  On the palate, this is ripe with black cherry and black raspberry fruit.  It is warming but not hot.  Nice texture.  Tons of fruit.  Its about pleasure not contemplation.  Long finish.  Certainly not for every one, but I like it at the right time.  

2011 Mollydooker Shiraz Blue Eyed Boy, Australia, Wine Review

This was opened at a blind tasting and I think the entire table guessed correctly what it was.  Certainly a distinctive wine.  Purple in color.  The nose has black olives, green olives and black cherries.  Nice enough.  On the palate, this is sweet and almost cloying.  Black raspberry fruit.  I had not had it in about 4 years and it hasn't held up that well (or it is in a bad spot right now).  It is certainly drinkable but given the price...  Some liked it more than I.  

 

What's the difference between Petite Syrah, Syrah, and Shiraz?

QUESTION: What's the difference between Petite Syrah, Syrah, and Shiraz? Syrah and Shiraz are the same grape. It tends to be labeled as Shiraz in Australia and Syrah in the rest of the world (remembering that in France it is more likely to have a geographic name such as St. Joseph or Cote Rotie). There are in fact different strains of Syrahs around the world and often in the same vineyard.