Wine & Health

A Discussion on the Legal Drinking Age in the U.S. - IntoWineTV Episode 151

IntoWineTV host Lisa Kolenda and wine panelists Bartholomew Broadbent, Michael Cervin, and Richard Jennings discuss the pros and cons of the legal drinking age in the U.S..

Q&A with Jenny LaFever, Founder of WineStraws

WineStrawsIntoWine recently caught up with WineStraws founder, Jenny LaFever, to discuss what WineStraws can do for you and to get the latest on this wine drinking trend.

What inspired the idea for wine straws?

The idea was born one night in December, 2007.  I had a few girlfriends over for wine and appetizers before we headed to a holiday party.  Two of the girls had recently had their teeth professionally whitened and (dentist’s orders) had to use a straw for their wine.  The rest of the girls and I decided we didn’t want wine staining our teeth either so we all decided to used a straw.  I had seen firsthand many times what a night of drinking red wine can look like!  Right away, aside from having fun trying something new, I noticed that the wine taste and experience was not minimized whatsoever, I had no staining, and my lipgloss stayed on lips—not the glass.  The only downfall to that first experience was the straw itself… it wasn’t perfect.  After many delicious trial runs and tests, what started out as a whim of an idea amongst a few wine loving friends has now turned into the conceptualization and launch of my company: WineStraws.

Sulfur in Wine, Demystified

Everyone’s seen the labeling on wine bottles: “Contains Sulfites.” There is no shortage of opinions as to whether sulfur should be used at all in the vineyard or the winery. Much like anything, with opinions comes confusion. As a wine-industry professional, I would like to dispel some of the myths.

When it comes right down to it, there is always going to be some sulfur in wine. Sulfur is a natural byproduct of the fermentation process (yes, small amounts of sulfur can be found in bread too) and it is one of the most useful tools a winemaker has.

Organic Wine and Biodynamics

This article is Part II of a two part series by Céline Guillou. Part I, "Green Wine: What Does "Green" Mean? Does it Taste Better?", can be viewed here.

Organic Wine

For many years, the simple mention of “organic wine” inspired a less than enthusiastic reaction from wine consumers, who generally viewed purveyors of organic wine as “tree-huggers”.

Green Wine: What Does "Green" Mean? Does it Taste Better?

It goes without saying that “green” is the new red. Talk of “green” is all over the media and fast spreading to every industry – food, automotive, home improvement, and now wine. But when it comes to wine, does “green” really taste better? And, more importantly, what does it actually mean?

"Green Wine": An Organic Wine Chat with Yield Owners Celine Guillou & Chris Tavelli

In the U.S. and abroad, the movement towards embracing organic foods is evolving rapidly. It seems a day can not pass without new information emerging concerning the health benefits of organic foods. Major grocers such as Whole Foods and Molly Stone’s are popping up in cities across the U.S. as consumers embrace the health benefits –and better taste – of organic foods. IntoWine.com recently chatted with Celine Guillou and Chris Tavelli, the owners of Yield, San Francisco’s first and only “green” wine bar, about “green” wine and the Yield Wine Bar experience.

Wine & Health

Something akin to the shot heard 'round the world on the dawn of American Revolutionary War, was heard in the wine world Sunday night, November 17, 1991.

Scientist Says Wine Reduces Death Rate

February 18, 1998, Filed at 2:36 a.m. EST
By The Associated Press

Wine in the Bible Commentary

Wine is referenced in many Bible passages:

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