2016 Lobster Point Sauvignon Blanc, New Zealand, Marlborough, Wine Review

Vintage: 
2016
Score: 
87
Grade: 
B

This was tried from Magnum.  A Magnum retails for $15.  That is crazy.  And, you know what, it's not bad at all.  Silvery green in color.  The nose has grapefruit and slight crushed shells.  On the palate, this is clean with grapefruit notes.  Very solid and refreshing not much depth but good energy.  Food friendly.  Amazing value.  

2016 Matua Sauvignon Blanc, New Zealand, Marlborough, Wine Review

Vintage: 
2016
Score: 
87
Grade: 
B

This is an inexpensive white wine from New Zealand.  A great choice for casual drinking at parties.  Light gold in color.  The nose has tropical fruits, gooseberry although not over the top.  On the palate, this is slightly sweet.  Still nice tropical fruit.  Easy drinking on its own.  Works with lighter foods.   

2017 The Sisters Pinot Noir, New Zealand, Marlborough, Wine Review

Vintage: 
2017
Score: 
88
Grade: 
B+

Screw capped.  Ruby in color, clear and bright.  In Pinot Noir, color often means little but this does have a very pretty lighter color.  The nose has cherries, slight smoke, rhubarb and slight celery notes.  It has a very soft, feminine texture.  On the palate, tart cherries with a slight bitter/herbal note on the finish.  12.5% alcohol on the label.   If you are looking for a bit, fruity wine, this is not that.  This is a lower alcohol wine that works well with food and is better situated to the dinner table than being drunk as a cocktail.  Not for everyone, but for those who are searchin

2017 The Sisters Pinot Gris, New Zealand, Marlborough, Wine Review

Vintage: 
2017
Score: 
89
Grade: 
B+

This is from New Zealand.  Screw capped.  Light gold/green in color, clear at the rim.  The nose is nice with mostly minerals but a bit of a steely quality to it.  Varietally correct.  On the palate, a slightly oily texture which is nice.  Slight grapefruit.  Good acidity.  Easy drinking.  Long finish.  Not a typical New Zealand wine in that it is more about the minerals than the fruit, but a lot of that is the varietal.  Worked well with food.  Around $18, this is a good value and a nice summer sipper.  

2015 Fairbourne Estate Sauvignon Blanc, New Zealand, Marlborough - Wine Review

Score: 
92
Grade: 
A-

Wow, this was one of the better Sauvignon Blancs from New Zealand that I have had in a while.  Blind, I would have guessed this to be from the Loire Valley.  Light gold in color.  The nose has nice white grapefruit with a nice minerality.  Those qualities contiue thru to the pa;late.  It is ripe but well within reason.  Excellent acidity.  Long finish.  My only complaint?  I tried to buy some and was unable to find any.  

Q&A with Fintan du Fresne, Winemaker at Chamisal Vineyards

As the son of well-known New Zealand wine journalist Fintan du Fresne grew up with an appreciation for the wine industry. Originally from the southern end of New Zealand’s North Island, he graduated from Victoria University with a degree in geology and set about exploring the relationship between geology and how it affects terroir in wines. He became winemaker at the historic Chamisal property (the first vineyard planted in the Edna Valley, located in San Luis Obispo County) in 2006, where the focus is on Pinot Noir and Chardonnay. Describe your winemaking philosophy. My philosophy is that there is no right way or wrong way to make wine. I’ve worked for enough different wineries in different parts of the world to have seen the same thing done in totally different ways. One winemaker will tell you “you can’t do it that way” while another winemaker is having complete success doing it “that way.” My job is not to make MY favorite wines or wines in the style that I like. My job is to make wines that our consumers love. Too many winemakers are making wine for other winemakers. However, I do believe in the concept of Terroir. A vineyard is going to produce a certain style of wine and that is not something I can change. I can help steer it in a certain direction, but that is all I can do. If Mother Nature is a raging river, a wine is like a kayak on that river. All I can do is steer it through the rapids.

Crisp and Refreshing Summer White Wines by Broadbent, Dr. Loosen, and Spy Valley

Wines to Go Buy This Week: Crisp and Refreshing Summer White Wines by Broadbent, Dr. Loosen, and Spy Valley The dog days of August are upon us and we have but a few weeks remaining before hot summer nights give way to crisp autumn leaves. This summer has been brutally hot for most of the US -though not too bad here in San Francisco, though September tends to be our hot month, if "hot" and "San Francisco" can actually be used in the same sentence- and I've had the great pleasure of discovering some fantastic white wines that are both tasty and refreshing for those hot nights. So before summer ends, here are three white wines to go buy this week : Broadbent Vinho Verde - Vinho Verde is a staple of Portuguese culture. Translated it means "Green Wine" which refers to its youthful freshness. It's a low-alcohol, light, crisp, and slightly effervescent wine that is about as close to perfection as a summer wine can be. Broadbent makes a fantastic Vinho Verde and at about $9 a bottle, it's worth buying a case to serve at your Labor Day picnic. Your guests will love it. About $9. Buy Broadbent Vinho Verde

New Zealand Vintage Chart

New Zealand 2010 90 D 2009 88 D 2008 87 D 2007 90 D 2006 89 D 2005 88 D 2004 90 D 2003 83 D 2002 89 D 2001 89 D 2000 85 D 1999 85 D Vintage Charts should be used for a generalized guide in lieu of specific knowledge about a bottle or producer. The better wines from a vintage will generally have...

Q&A with Nicholas Buck, Te Mata Estate

Established in 1896, Te Mata Estate remains family owned, producing internationally recognized wines exclusively from its Hawkes Bay vineyards. Under the direction of John Buck, Te Mata Estate has, over nearly thirty years, produced a stunning array of red and white wines. Te Mata Estate has also developed a unique single vineyard from which it produces its Woodthorpe wines. IntoWine recently caught up with Te Mata Estate to discuss wine and thoughts on current trends in the wine industry. What prompted you to pursue winemaking as a career? I was born into wine, grew up in it, and was exposed to too many wonderful wines at an impressionable age. I’ve since been unable to consider any other career.

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